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Publication numberUS3844125 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date29 Oct 1974
Filing date13 Jul 1973
Priority date13 Jul 1973
Publication numberUS 3844125 A, US 3844125A, US-A-3844125, US3844125 A, US3844125A
InventorsWilliams J
Original AssigneeWilliams J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Anti-erosion device
US 3844125 A
Abstract
Apparatus for controlling erosion of the earth primarily in sound and beach areas by water and wind. The apparatus includes a frame having a substructure to be embedded in the earth and a superstructure for trapping and retaining earth which is being displaced by either water or wind.
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[451 Oct. 29, 1974 United States Patent [191 Williams, Sr.

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Primary Examiner-Paul R. Gilliam Assistant Examiner-Alex Grosz Attorney, Agent, or Firm-A. Yates Dowell, Jr.

[22] Filed: July 13, 1973 [2l] Appl. No.: 379,145

478,154 7/1892 61/3 801,603 10/1905 61/3 6 Claims, 10 Drawmg FlgUreS BACKGROUNDOF THE INVENTION l. Field of the Invention This invention relates generally to soil conservation and relates particularly to apparatus for restricting the movement of loose earth to prevent the eroding away of the earth by water and wind, as well as for trapping and causing a buildup of earth in a localized area.

2. Description of the Prior Art Eroding of the soil by water and wind has presented a problem for many years since much of such soil which is diaplaced by rain and wind is washed into rivers and other water courses. Some of the soil within the waterways falls out of suspension and settles to the bottom thereby reducing the depth of the waterways so that navigable waterways must be dredged periodically to permit boats and other water-borne vehicles to travel. Other soil in the waterways is eventually washed out to sea and is lost.

In coastal areas the soil is not only affected by rain and wind, but also is affected by the action of waves and tides which in many areas are washing away as much as two feet of land per year. Many efforts have been made to prevent the erosion of land such as by constructing fences and other barriers on the land and by constructing breakwaters, jetties, groins, and the like along the coastal areas. Some examples of prior art structures which seek to provide an answer to the problem of erosion are U.S. Pat. Nos. 3,309,876 to Potter, and No. 3,724,22l to Cool; Canadian Pat. No. 745,380 to Katayama; and French Pat. Nos. 566,423 to Ravier and No. 718,931 to Dufour.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention is embodied in a device having a substructure to be embedded in the earth for maintaining the device in fixed position and a superstructure for trapping and confining water or air-entrained particles of earth to cause a buildup of such earth. Along coastal areas, the device can be emplaced either in the water or on the beach to resist erosion. When placed in water, the device serves as an 'artificial shoal which traps sand displaced by wind, wave and tidal action and thereby not only prevents erosion of the soil but recovers sand and other earth suspended in the water which is washed in from areas remote from the device to effect a rebuilding of the land areas.

It is an object of the invention to provide an apparatus located in fixed position and having structure for trapping and confining water and airborne particles of sand and soil.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a top plan view showing one application of the invention along a coastal area.

FIG. 2 is an end elevation of the device in use.

FIG. 3 is a top perspective view of the device.

FIG. 4 is a bottom perspective view thereof.

FIG. 5 is an enlarged section on the line 5-5 of FIG. 3.

FIG. 6 is a section on the line 6-6 of FIG. 5. FIG. 7 is a fragmentary front elevation illustrating two units connected in end-to-end relationship.

FIG. 8 is an end elevation of a plurality of independent units in stacked relationship.

FIG. 9 is a bottom perspective view of a modified form used as an upper unit.

FIG. l0 is an enlarged fragmentary side elevation illustrating the manner of connecting a plurality of stacked units in assembled relationship.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS With continued reference to the drawings, the antierosion device of the present invention includes a body l0 having a frame 1l. The frame includes a pair of generally parallel side members l2 connected by a plurality of generally parallel cross members 13-16 disposed generally normal to the side members l2. Although four cross members have been illustrated, a greater or lesser number could be provided if desired. The frame ll can be of any desired size although a frame approximately six feet wide and twenty feet long has been found satisfactory. As illustrated in FIGS. I, 2 and 8 the front of the device faces the shore or against the primary direction of erosion, or flow of eroded materials, which is indicated by the arrow 17.

A superstructure 20 is mounted on the frame ll and such superstructure includes upwardly and inwardly inclined front and rear brace members 2l and 22, respectively, having their lower ends connected to opposite ends of each of the side members I2. The upper ends of the brace members 2l and 22 are connected to a substantially flat top member 23 which is generally parallel with the side members 12 and located substantially three feet above the same in the illustrated example. The top members 23 at each end of the superstructure are connected by an upper relatively wide cross member 24, while the front brace members 2l and rear brace members 22 are connected by intermediate cross members 25 and 26, respectively.

A plurality of posts or barrier members 27 connect the cross member 13 to the front intermediate cross member 25 as illustrated in FIG. 5. Such posts are inclined upwardly and forwardly from the cross member 13 to the cross member 25. A plurality of posts 27 are equally spaced along the cross members and generally the spacing between the posts is substantially equal to the width of such posts.

A second series of posts 28 are located rearwardly of the posts 27 and extend upwardly and forwardly from the cross member 14 to the front portion of the upper cross member 24. As illustrated best in FIG. 6, the posts 28 are spaced apart a distance substantially equal to the spacing of the posts 27 and in staggered relationship therewith so that the posts 28 are substantially in alignment with the spacings between the posts 27.

A third series of posts 29 extend upwardly and forwardly from the cross member l5 of the frame to the rear portion of the upper cross member 24. The posts 29 are substantially in horizontal alignment with the posts 27 and in staggered relationship with the posts 28 so that the posts 29 are substantially in alignment with the opening between the posts 28. A fourth series of posts 30 extend upwardly and forwardly from the cross member 16 of the frame to the rear intermediate cross member 26 and are arranged in staggered relationship with the posts 29.

The posts 27-30 preferably are of a shape to trap a deposit of sarid or soil which is flowing in the direction that causes erosion. In the illustrated embodiment, the

posts are generally V-shaped in cross-section and are positioned Aso that the open ends face toward the shore when used in a beach or sound area. When used on land, the open ends of the posts face in the direction from which the eroding flow occurs. Shapes other than V-'shape may obviously be employed depending upon local conditions and the elements involved.

In order to mount the body in fixed position, a substructure is provided for the frame ll and such substructure includes a plurality of spurs or tines 33-36 equally spaced along each of the side members 12 and extending downwardly therefrom. The rearmost spurs 36 extend downwardly a distance substantially equal to the height of the top member 23 from the side members l2, while the front spurs 33 extend downwardly a distance substantially half the depth ofthe rear spurs. Intermediate spurs 34 and 35 extend downwardly from each of the side members l2 and such intermediate spurs terminate along an imaginary line drawn from the tips of the front spurs 33 to the tips of the rear spurs 36. With particular reference to FIG. 4, a plurality of spurs 37 are equally spaced along the cross member 16 and extend downwardly a distance corresponding to the length of the rear spurs 36 on the side members. Each of the cross members 13, 14 and l5 is provided with a plurality of spaced downwardly extending spurs 38 which may be of a length corresponding generally to the length of the front spurs 33 of the side members 12 or may be of a length corresponding to the length of the intermediate spurs 34 and 35 of such side members.

In order to connect a plurality of bodies l0 together in assembled end-to-end relationship to define a retaining wall or barrier, as illustrated in FIG. l, an upright sleeve or base member 40 is secured at its lower end to the side member l2. The base member is located along a generally vertical axis and the upper end is secured to the top member 23 in spaced relationship to the upper surface thereof. A mast or guide post 4l is attached to the base member 40 along the vertical axis thereof and the mast extends a substantial distance above the body 10. The base member 40 and mast 41 are located substantially centrally of one of the side members 12.

At the opposite end of the body 10, a ring or mast receiving member 42 is connected to the top member 23 and extends horizontally outwardly therefrom. Such ring is of a size to slidably receive the mast 41 of the next adjacent body and form a swivel connection which permits limited horizontal and vertical swinging movement during assembly.

When the device is in use, the forwardly facing V- shaped posts 27-30 collect and retain sand and soil and cause such deposit to build up within the body as well as to the front and rear of the body. As illustrated in FIG. 8, when the deposit has built up to a level approaching the top of the body 10, a modified or upper body 44 can be mounted on each of the bodies 10 in stacked relationship therewith.. In the upper body 44, the frame 11 andthe superstructure 20 are substantially identical to the corresponding portions of the body l0. However, the substructure is altered slightly in order to nest with the lower body l0.

ln the modified upper body the intermediate spurs 34 and 35 extending downwardly from the side member l2 are omitted since such spurs would be substantially in alignment with the front brace member 2l and the top member 23 of the body 10. The rear spurs 36 are offset inwardly onto the cross member 16 (FIG. 9) to avoid engagement with the rear brace member 22. Additionally, the intermediate spurs 38 of the cross member 15 are omitted since such cross member of the upper body normally engages the upper cross member 24 of the lower body 10.

ln order to mount the upper bodies 44 on the masts 4l of the lower bodies, one end of each of the upper bodies 44 is provided with a horizontally disposed outwardly extending ring 45 which is connected to the side member l2 and is adapted to receive a mast 41 of the body immediately below the same. The opposite end of the upper body 44 has a horizontally disposed ring 46 extending outwardly from the top member 23. The ring 46 slidably receives the mast of the next adjacent lower body, as illustrated in FIG. l0.

It is contemplated that the bodies 10 and 44 can be cast as a unitary member by using concrete or other plastic material, or such bodies can be fabricated of a plurality of individual metal parts joined together in any desired manner, as by fasteners, welding or the like. When the device is constructed of metal, such metal preferably is rust-resistant such as aluminum or CORTEN as produced by U.S. Steel Company, Inc.

In operation, when the device is immersed in water along a coastal area, a first body 10 is placed in approximately five feet of water so that the mast 41 projects above the mean water level and functions not only as a guide for the next adjacent body, but also as a signal to warn bathers, boaters, fishermen and the like of the existence of the structure and of the waters depth. When the first body is in position, a downward force on the frame 11 causes the spurs 33-38 to penetrate the soil at the bottom of the body of water until the frame l2 rests on such bottom. An adjacent body is placed in position with the ring 42 slidably engaging the mast 4l of the first body. Preferably a series of bodies are connected together in an arc curved away from the shore line and terminating with opposite ends of the arc being disposed in approximately five feet of water. As waves come in from the sea they carry particles of sand and earth toward the beach and as the waves recede they carry sand and earth from the beach back toward the sea. The outward movement of the sand and earth is resisted by the posts 27-30 whichy trap the sand while per- I mitting water to pass between such posts. Sand which is trapped settles to the bottom and gradually builds up until the bodies 10 are substantially covered.

When the lower bodies 10 are substantially covered with sand, an upper body 44 may be placed on each of the lower bodies in stacked relationship therewith. As illustrated in FIG. 8, the upper body 44 is offset slightly toward the shore so that the rear spurs 36 and 37 pass downwardly between the upper cross member 24 and the rear intermediate cross member 26 of the lower body l0. I n order to guide the upper bodies 44 into correct position, the rings 45 and 46 of the upper members slidably receive the upwardly extending masts 41 of two adjacent lower bodies l0.

When the device is to be used on land, the bodies l0 are placed along downwardly inclined areas in a position to intercept soil being eroded by rain and wind.

l claim:

l. An anti-erosion device for trapping and retaining earthen materials being eroded by water and wind in a localized area comprising an elongated frame, a superstructure mounted on said frame and extending upwardly therefrom, said superstructure including a plurality of spaced substantially parallel rows of generally vertically disposed post means, each of said post means in each of said rows being horizontally spaced relative tothe adjacent post means of the same row thereby providing a plurality of vertically disposed and horizontally spaced openings along each of said rows, the post means of one row being horizontally staggered relative to the post means of the next adjacent row so that substantially all water or wind moving in a direction generally normal to said plurality of rows of said post means follows a tortuous path through said spaced openings in said rows and the earthen materials carried by the water or wind passing through said device are normally trapped by said post means, said frame having a substructure including downwardly extending groundengaging spur means for penetrating the earth and anchoring said frame in fixed position, and means for connecting a plurality of frames together in assembled endto-end relationship, whereby said post means trap and retain earth being eroded by water and wind.

2. The structure of claim l in which said frame includes generally parallel side members connected by at least one cross member, each of said side members having at least one of said downwardly extending groundengaging spur means, and said cross member having at least one of said downwardly extending groundengaging spur means.

3. The structure of claim 2 in which each of said side members includes a plurality of said downwardly extending ground-engaging spur means with the rearmost spur means being substantially longer than the front spur means.

4. The structure of claim 1 in which said means for connecting said frames together includes an upwardly extending mast located at one end of each of said frames, and means at the opposite end of each frame for slidably receiving the mast of an adjacent frame.

5. The structure of claim l in which said frame includes front and rear cross members and at least one intermediate cross member, said plurality of rows of said post means includes a row of post means of relatively short height along each of said front and rear cross members and a row of post means of relatively longer length along said intermediate cross members,

and means connecting the upper ends of the posts to said frame.

6. An anti-erosion device for trapping and retaining earthen materials being eroded by water and wind in a localized area comprising a body, said body including an elongated frame having generally parallel side members connected by a plurality of cross members disposed generally normal to said side members, a superstructure mounted on said frame and extending upwardly therefrom, said superstructure including a plurality of spaced cross members generally parallel to the cross members of said frame, a plurality of rows of generally vertically disposed V-shaped posts extending between and connected to the cross members of said frame and the cross members of said superstructure,

each of said V-shaped posts being open toward the front of said frame, each of said posts in each of said rows being horizontally spaced relative to the adjacent posts of the same row thereby providing a plurality of vertically disposed and horizontally spaced openings j along each of said rows, the posts of one row being horizontally staggered relative to the posts of the next ad jacent row, so that water or wind moving in a direction generally normal to said plurality of rows of said posts follows a tortuous path through said spaced openings in said rows and the earthen materials carried by the water or wind passing through said device normally are trapped by said posts, a substructure including a plurality of spurs extending downwardly from each of said side members, the rearmost spur of each side member being longer than the other spurs of said side members, at least certain of said frame cross members having a plurality of downwardly extending spurs connected thereto, said spurs extending into the earth to anchor said frame in fixed position, a mast fixed to one of said side members and extending upwardly a substantial distance above said superstructure, ring means carried by the superstructure at the end of the frame remote from said mast, said ring means slidably receiving the mast carried by an adjacent frame, whereby a plurality of frames can be joined together in end-to-end relationship so that the V-shaped posts form a barrier which traps and retains earth being eroded by water and wind. k ak

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US478154 *24 Jul 18915 Jul 1892 carson
US801603 *18 Apr 190510 Oct 1905David NealeSubmerged dike.
US954283 *17 Jan 19085 Apr 1910Frederick W HawkesRevetment.
US1775820 *19 Nov 192716 Sep 1930Johannes Angus WSilt accumulator
US2709073 *12 Feb 195424 May 1955Dougherty Earle TFence structure
US3309876 *13 Feb 196421 Mar 1967Potter John MErosion prevention apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3894397 *5 Aug 197415 Jul 1975Fair Samuel SBeach erosion control structure
US3927533 *13 Aug 197423 Dec 1975Hebel Jr Robert NewmanUnderwater wall structure
US3952521 *29 Oct 197427 Apr 1976Potter John MPortable floating wave tripper
US4028894 *14 Aug 197514 Jun 1977Ole Fjord LarsenApparatus for preventing erosion of the seabed in front of hydraulic structures
US4367978 *15 Sep 198011 Jan 1983Cecil SchaafDevice for preventing beach erosion
US4479740 *6 May 198230 Oct 1984Paul A. KakurisErosion control device and method of making and installing same
US4669913 *26 Sep 19852 Jun 1987John TempleMethod of raising and extending an ocean beach
US4978247 *27 Feb 198718 Dec 1990Lenson Walter JErosion control device
US5015121 *19 Mar 199014 May 1991Perret Gentil Hubert BOffshore erosion protection assembly
US5429450 *11 Apr 19944 Jul 1995Meidinger; LouiseErosion control barrier
US5888020 *21 Aug 199730 Mar 1999Brais; Joseph E.Sub-tidal platform
US6824327 *27 May 200330 Nov 2004David M. WalterArtifical barrier reef
US96833463 Dec 201520 Jun 2017Ocean Brick Systems (O.B.S.) Ltd.Perforated structure mountable onto a seabed
US20040120768 *30 Jun 200324 Jun 2004Won-Hoi YangFrame type breakwater
US20070224021 *19 Mar 200727 Sep 2007G. S.R.L.Rapid-assembly earth retaining device
US20080240861 *25 Jan 20082 Oct 2008Amanda PhillipsPrefabricated levee apparatus and system
US20100178109 *3 Jun 200915 Jul 2010Dave David Matthew WilsonSelf-adjusting wave break
WO2007024124A1 *28 Aug 20061 Mar 2007Eun Chyun KyungBreakwater
WO2010082198A214 Jan 201022 Jul 2010Ocean Brick System (O.B.S.) Ltd.A deep-water port
Classifications
U.S. Classification405/33
International ClassificationE02B3/04
Cooperative ClassificationE02B3/04
European ClassificationE02B3/04